Task-Specific Intervention with Children Reduces Movement Problems

in Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly

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Gay RevieUniversity of New South Wales

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Dawne LarkinUniversity of Western Australia

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This investigation examined the effects of eight sessions of intensive teaching of motor tasks on children with poor coordination. The 24 children, aged 5 to 9 years, were grouped by age and assigned to 1 of 10 teachers. These teachers were then randomly assigned to either Task Treatment Group 1 (TTG1) to teach both the overarm throw and hopping to their allocated children or Task Treatment Group 2 (TTG2) to teach target kicking and the volleyball bounce and catch. Each group acted as the other group’s control. Repeated measures ANOVA of pretest-posttest scores showed that intensive teaching of the overarm throw, target kicking, and the bounce-and-catch task resulted in significant gains for the respective groups.

Revie is with the School of Sport and Leisure Studies, University of New South Wales, St. George Campus, P.O. Box 88, Oatley, N.S.W. 2223, Australia. Larkin is with the Department of Human Movement, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, W.A., 6009, Australia.

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