The Competitive Disposition: Views of Athletes with Mental Retardation

in Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly
View More View Less
  • 1 Western Illinois University
  • 2 University of Northern Iowa
Restricted access

Purchase Article

USD  $24.95

Student 1 year online subscription

USD  $64.00

1 year online subscription

USD  $86.00

Student 2 year online subscription

USD  $122.00

2 year online subscription

USD  $162.00

The twofold purpose of this study was (a) to determine the perspectives held by athletes with mental retardation relative to competitiveness, winning, and setting goals in competitive team sports situations and (b) to explore differences between male and female athletes with mental retardation and their counterparts without disabilities regarding their perceptions of competitiveness, winning, and setting goals in team sports environments. Of the 402 subjects who completed the Sport Orientation Questionnaire-Form B (Gill & Deeter, 1988), 288 were male and female athletes with mental retardation who participated in team sports at the 1991 International Special Olympic Games. They were compared with 114 university team sports athletes without disabilities. Analyses of variance revealed that, regardless of disability status, young men viewed themselves to be more competitive than their female counterparts. The findings also indicated that male athletes with mental retardation were more competitive than other athletes and that male athletes without disabilities perceived winning to be more important than did athletes with mental retardation.

Dean A. Zoerink is with the Department of Recreation, Parks, and Tourism Administration, College of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL 61455. Joseph Wilson is with the School of Physical Education, Health, and Leisure Services at the University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA 50613.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 76 60 1
Full Text Views 3 3 2
PDF Downloads 2 2 1