The Effect of Peer Tutors on Motor Performance in Integrated Physical Education Classes

in Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly
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The effect of untrained and trained peer tutors on the motor performance of students with developmental disabilities in integrated physical education classes was studied. This study used a single-subject delayed multiple baseline design across six participants (5 boys and 1 girl, ages 9 to 11) with developmental disabilities. Six typically developing peers served as peer tutors. The ability to perform critical elements of fundamental motor skills was the dependent variable. Students were assigned to one of two protocols. Protocol 1 consisted of three conditions: baseline, assistance by an untrained peer tutor, and assistance by a trained peer tutor. Protocol 1 revealed that trained peer tutors were effective at assisting participants to improve their motor performance while untrained peer tutors were not. Protocol 2, which consisted only of a baseline and trained, peer tutoring, was used to replicate and provide additional support for the effect of trained peer tutors. Results revealed that trained peer tutors were effective at assisting participants to improve their motor performance in integrated physical education classes.

Cathy Houston-Wilson is with the Department of Physical Education and Sport at SUNY College at Brockport, Brockport, NY 14420. John M. Dunn is with the College of Health at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112. Hans van der Mars and Jeffrey McCubbin are both with the Department of Exercise and Sport Science at Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331.