The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of Evidence-Based Practice1

in Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly

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Marcel BouffardUniversity of Alberta, Canada

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Greg ReidMcGill University, Canada

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The evidence-based practice (EBP) movement has been extremely influential over the last 20 years. Fields like medicine, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, nursing, psychology, and education have adopted the idea that policy makers and practitioners should use interventions that have demonstrated efficiency and effectiveness. This apparently straightforward idea is beginning to affect adapted physical activity; however, researchers and practitioners in our field often appear to be unaware of fundamental questions related to them. The major purpose of this paper is to outline and discuss 10 of these fundamental questions. This analysis leads us to conclude that EBP is a good direction to pursue in adapted physical activity if we develop a type of EBP congruent with the main tenets of our field.

Marcel Bouffard is with the Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation at the University of Alberta, Canada. Greg Reid is with the Kinesiology & Physical Education Department at McGill University in Quebec, Canada.

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