Thinking Ethically About Professional Practice in Adapted Physical Activity

in Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly
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There has been little critical exploration of the ethical issues that arise in professional practice common to adapted physical activity. We cannot avoid moral issues as we inevitably will act in ways that will negatively affect the well-being of others. We will make choices, which in our efforts to support others, may hurt by violating dignity or infringing on rights. The aim of this paper is to open a dialogue on what constitutes ethical practice in adapted physical activity. Ethical theories including principlism, virtue ethics, ethics of care, and relational ethics provide a platform for addressing questions of right and good and wrong and bad in the field of adapted physical activity. Unpacking of stories of professional practice (including sacred, secret, and cover stories) against the lived experiences of persons experiencing disability will create a knowledge landscape in adapted physical activity that is sensitive to ethical reflection.

Donna Goodwin is with the Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation at the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Brenda Rossow-Kimball is with the Faculty of Kinesiology & Health Studies at the University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.

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