Understanding Dignity: Experiences of Impairment in an Exercise Facility

in Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly
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  • 1 University of Alberta
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Dignity, as an essential quality of being human, has been overlooked in exercise contexts. The aim of this interpretative phenomenological study was to understand the meaning of dignity and its importance to exercise participation. The experiences of 21 adults (11 women and 10 men) from 19 to 65 yr of age who experience disability, who attended a specialized community exercise facility, were gathered using the methods of focus-group and one-on-one interviews, visual images, and field notes. The thematic analysis revealed 4 themes: the comfort of feeling welcome, perceptions of otherness, negotiating public spaces, and lost autonomy. Dignity was subjectively understood and nurtured through the respect of others. Indignities occurred when enacted social and cultural norms brought dignity to consciousness through humiliation or removal of autonomy. The specialized exercise environment promoted self-worth and positive self-beliefs through shared life experiences and a norm of respect.

The authors are with the Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.

Address author correspondence to Keith Johnston at keith.johnston@ualberta.ca
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