In-Service Physical Educators’ Experiences of Online Adapted Physical Education Endorsement Courses

in Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly

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Takahiro SatoKent State University

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Justin A. HaegeleOld Dominion University

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Rachel FootKent State University

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The purpose of this study was to investigate in-service physical education (PE) teachers’ experiences during online adapted physical education (APE) graduate courses. Based on andragogy theory (adult learning theory) we employed a descriptive qualitative methodology using an explanatory case study design. The participants (6 female and 3 male) were in-service PE teachers enrolled in an online graduate APE endorsement program. Data collection included journal reflection reports and face-to-face interviews. A constant comparative method was used to interpret the data. Three interrelated themes emerged from the participants’ narratives. The first theme, instructor communication, exposes the advantages and disadvantages the participants perceived regarding communication while enrolled in the online APE graduate courses. The second theme, bulletin board discussion experiences, described participants’ perceptions of the use of the bulletin board discussion forum. Lastly, the final theme, assessment experiences, described how the participants learned knowledge and skills through online courses related to assessment and evaluation.

Sato is with the School of Teaching, Learning, & Curriculum Studies, and Foot, the College of Nursing, Kent State University, Kent, OH. Haegele is with the Dept. of Human Movement Sciences, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA.

Address author correspondence to Takahiro Sato at tsato@kent.edu
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