Understanding Disability: Biopsychology, Biopolitics, and an In-Between-All Politics

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What do disability labels give us and what do they steal from us? How possible is it to live our lives without categories when life is necessarily categorical? In this brief provocation, I want to explore the disability labels through recourse to three perspectives that have much to say about categorization, disability, and the human condition: the biopsychological, the biopolitical, and, what I term, an in-between-all politics. It is my view that disability categories intervene in the world in some complex and often contradictory ways. One way of living with contradictions is to work across disciplinary boundaries, thus situating ourselves across divides and embracing uncertainty and contradiction to enhance all our lives. I will conclude with some interdisciplinary thoughts for the field of adapted physical activity.

The author is with the School of Education and iHuman: The Research Inst. for the Study of the Human, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom.

Address correspondence to d.goodley@sheffield.ac.uk.
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