Theory of Planned Behavior in Research Examining Physical Activity Factors Among Individuals With Disabilities: A Review

in Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly
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The theory of planned behavior is a psychological framework designed to examine the relationship between beliefs and volitional behaviors such as physical activity engagement. The purpose of this article was to evaluate the published empirical literature on the use of the theory of planned behavior in the context of physical activity beliefs and behaviors of individuals with disabilities. Electronic-database searches were conducted to identify relevant articles published between 1990 and 2018, yielding 11 articles that met all criteria for inclusion. Data such as population, measures, research design, and results were extracted from qualifying studies. Article quality was addressed using modified versions of the National Institutes of Health’s Quality Assessment Tools. In keeping with the theory of planned behavior model, major findings indicate that intention to be physically active has the strongest relationship with physical activity behavior, while the predictive usefulness of belief factors was mixed, among individuals with disabilities.

Kirk and Haegele are with Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA.

Kirk (tkirk001@odu.edu) is corresponding author.
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