Understanding the Inclusiveness of Integrated Physical Education From the Perspectives of Adults With Visual Impairments

in Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly
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  • 1 Old Dominion University
  • 2 The Ohio State University
  • 3 University of Louisiana at Lafayette
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The purpose of this study was to examine the perspectives of individuals with visual impairment toward inclusion and the inclusiveness of their integrated physical education experiences. A retrospective, qualitative-description research approach was used, and 10 adults (age 20–35 years) with visual impairments acted as the participants. The data sources included one-on-one telephone interviews and reflective interview notes. A theoretical thematic analysis approach was used to analyze the data. Three interrelated themes were identified: “I always felt like a misfit”: a missing sense of belonging, acceptance, and value; “I felt very excluded, very pushed to the side”: lack of access to activity participation; and “Even though it sucked, I do agree with it”: preference for integrated settings. Collectively, the participants recalled that experiencing feelings of inclusion during physical education were rare. Despite this, they expressed a perceived importance of being integrated in contexts with their peers.

Haegele, Zhu, and Holland are with Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA. Hodge is with The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH. Wilson is with the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA.

Haegele (jhaegele@odu.edu) is corresponding author.
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