Developing a Theory-Driven Intervention to Challenge Coach Thinking: A Case Study

in Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology
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Coaching as a profession is a complex role that requires professional, interpersonal, and intrapersonal knowledge . In order for coaches to develop expertise in these areas, continued education can be beneficial. The case study presented focuses on the development and dissemination of a coach-education intervention designed to challenge coach thinking surrounding the coach-expectancy cycle. The coach-expectancy cycle is a well-researched model of coach behavior that follows a 4-stage cyclical pattern in which coaches develop biases based on their previous experiences. These biases then affect coach behavior toward athletes, which in turn affects athlete performance and motivation. Finally, athlete performance reinforces coach expectations. The authors developed a 2-hr theory-based intervention promoting mitigation of the cycle in a group of youth-soccer coaches. Theories used, the intervention, and practitioner reflections are discussed.

Pasquini is with the Dept. of Kinesiology, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX. Thompson is with Kinesiology, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS.

Pasquini (exp043@shsu.edu) is corresponding author.
Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology
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