Health Belief Model and Theory of Planned Behavior: A Theoretical Approach for Enhancing Lower Extremity Injury Prevention Program Participation

in International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training
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  • 1 Old Dominion University
  • 2 University of Kentucky
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The integration of theoretical models into exercise-related injury prevention research may advance our understanding of the reasons why adoption and compliance of exercise-related injury prevention programs (ERIPPs) is low. A new model which integrates the Health Belief Model and Theory of Planned Behavior has been developed to provide insights into the behavioral determinants of ERIPP participation. There are several steps which must be taken to begin utilizing these theoretical models within ERIPP research, including creating an effective assessment tool, assessing the behavioral determinants of ERIPP participation within the target population, and developing and testing interventions based on these theoretical models.

Emily M. Hartley is with the School of Physical Therapy and Athletic Training, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA. Matthew C. Hoch is with the Division of Athletic Training, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY. Robert J. Cramer is with the School of Community & Environmental Health, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA. Timothy A. McGuine, PhD, University of Wisconsin-Madison, is the report editor for this article.

Address author correspondence to Emily M. Hartley at Ehart001@odu.edu.
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