Sports Medicine Staff Size Influences Exertional Heat Illness Policies in High School Football

in International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training
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All high schools should implement exertional heat illness (EHI) safety strategies. We determined if there were differences in the implementation of EHI safety strategies between schools with and without additional paid athletic trainers (ATs) or a team physician present at preseason football practices. High schools with multiple ATs or a team physician implemented more EHI prevention and management strategies than schools with only a single AT, including training staff in EHI recognition and treatment and having an emergency action plan. However, schools with a paid team physician were more likely to have double practices in the first week of football practice. Schools with additional medical personnel at football preseason practices were more likely to implement EHI safety strategies.

Riana R. Pryor is with the Department of Kinesiology, Central California Sports Sciences Institute, California State University, Fresno, CA. Douglas J. Casa is with the Department of Kinesiology, Korey Stringer Institute, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT. Susan W. Yeargin is with the Department of Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC. Zachary Y. Kerr is with the Department of Exercise and Sport Science, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC. Stephanie Mazerolle, PhD, ATC, University of Connecticut, is the report editor for this article.

Address author correspondence to Riana R. Pryor at RianaPryor@mail.fresnostate.edu.
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