Exertional Rhabdomyolysis in a Women’s Tennis Athlete: A Case Report

in International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training
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A 19-year-old female tennis athlete with a history of hypohydration presented with cottonmouth, tunnel vision, and muscle cramping following an in-season tennis match. The patient was referred to the emergency department where she was subsequently diagnosed with exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER). Both clinical presentation and laboratory values are pertinent considerations leading to the diagnosis of ER. Specifically, creatine kinase (CK) levels and urine-specific gravity (USG) should be monitored during treatment and recovery, particularly in patients seeking to return to activity. This case presents a unique case of ER in a female individual sport athlete as well as a documented protocol for return to activity supported by current evidence.

Henderson and Stubblefield are with Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL. Manspeaker is with Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA.

Henderson (khenderson@nova.edu) is corresponding author.
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