Incidence and Force Application of Head Impacts in Men’s Lacrosse: A Pilot Study

in International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training
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  • 1 University of New England
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Subconcussive head impacts in sport may have a greater impact on neurological degradation versus concussive hits given the repetitive nature of these head impacts. The purpose of this investigation was to quantify the frequency, magnitude, and location of head impacts in an NCAA Division III men’s lacrosse team. There was no significant difference (p ≤ .05) in peak linear acceleration, peak rotational acceleration, and peak rotational velocity between games and practices. There was no significant difference (p ≤ .05) for PLA among player position and location of head impact. The quantity and intensity of subconcussive head impacts between practices and games were similar. These multiple subconcussive head impacts have the potential to lead to future neurological impairments.

The authors are with the Department of Exercise and Sport Performance, University of New England, Biddeford, ME, USA.

Rosene (jrosene@une.edu) is corresponding author.
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