Kendo Protective Equipment Prevents Quick Access for Resuscitation During Sudden Cardiac Arrest: A Cross-Over Manikin Study

in International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training
Shota Tanaka BS, ATC, EMT-P * , 1 , 2 , Hiroki Ueta PhD, EMT-P * , 3 , Ryo Sagisaka PhD, EMT-P * , 1 , Shuji Sakanashi MEM, EMT-P * , 1 , 3 , Takahiro Hara PhD, EMT-P * , 1 and Hideharu Tanaka MD, PhD * , 1
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  • 1 Kokushikan University
  • 2 Tokai University
  • 3 Meiji University of Integrative Medicine
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Protective equipment in sports can be a barrier to sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) treatment, but no Kendo-related data are available. In order to enhance the SCA survival rate, we aimed to determine whether Kendo protective equipment should be removed before or after an automated external defibrillator (AED) has arrived by measuring the quality and timeframe of cardiopulmonary resuscitation administration. Eighteen collegiate female Kendo players were instructed to treat the patient with SCA under two conditions: (a) equipment removal [ER] condition; (b) no equipment removal [NER] condition. Chest compression initiation was delayed during simulated cardiac arrest situations in Kendo, but the SCA quality was much better without protective equipment. When a layperson is only a nonhealthcare professional female, Kendo protective equipment becomes a barrier for quick access during SCA treatment of Kendo players.

S. Tanaka and H. Tanaka are with the Research Institute of Disaster Management and EMS, Kokushikan University, Tokyo, Japan. S. Tanaka is also with the School of Medicine, Tokai University, Tokyo, Japan. Ueta and Sakanashi are with the Faculty of Emergency Medical Science, Meiji University of Integrative Medicine, Nantan, Kyoto, Japan. Sagisaka, Sakanashi, Hara, and H. Tanaka are with the Graduate School of EMS System, Kokushikan University, Tokyo, Japan.

S. Tanaka (tanakamedical24@gmail.com) is corresponding author.
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