Lower Extremity Biomechanical Differences Between Female Dancers and Soccer Players

in International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training
View More View Less
  • 1 University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • 2 Northern Kentucky University
Restricted access

Purchase article

USD  $24.95

Student 1 year online subscription

USD  $76.00

1 year online subscription

USD  $101.00

Student 2 year online subscription

USD  $144.00

2 year online subscription

USD  $192.00

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in female athletes is common. Team sport athletes experience more ACL injuries than ballet and modern dancers. Examining biomechanical differences between these two groups may help to explain the discrepancy in ACL injury rates. The purpose of this study was to examine lower extremity kinematic differences between collegiate dancers and National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I soccer athletes during a rebound jump-landing task. Peak hip, knee, and ankle kinematics were collected during a jump-landing task. Results showed more knee flexion and less ankle eversion in the dancers compared to the soccer athletes. Differences in training and strategies used during landing may explain the kinematic differences between groups.

Ericksen is with the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI, USA. Vogelpohl is with Northern Kentucky University, Highland Heights, KY, USA.

Ericksen (erickseh@uwm.edu) is corresponding author.
  • 1.

    Hootman JM, Dick R, Agel J. Epidemiology of collegiate injuries for 15 sports: summary and recommendations for injury prevention initiatives. J Athl Train. 2007;42(2):311319.

    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2.

    Boden B, Sheehan F, Torg J, Hewett T. Non-contact ACL Injuries: mechanisms and risk factors. J Am Acad Orthop Surg. 2010;18(9):520527.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 3.

    Renstrom P, Ljungqvist A, Arendt E, et al. Non-contact ACL injuries in female athletes: an International Olympic Committee current concepts statement. Br J Sports Med. 2008;42(6):394412.

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 4.

    Hewett TE, Ford KR, Myer GD. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries in female athletes: part 2, a meta-analysis of neuromuscular interventions aimed at injury prevention. Am J Sports Med. 2006;34(3):490498.

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5.

    Boden BP, Dean GS, Feagin JA Jr, Garrett WE Jr. Mechanisms of anterior cruciate ligament injury. Orthopedics. 2000;23(6):573578.

  • 6.

    Agel J, Rockwood T, Klossner D. Collegiate ACL injury rates across 15 sports: National Collegiate Athletic Association injury surveillance system data update (2004-2005 through 2012-2013). Clin J Sports Med. 2016;26(6):518523.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7.

    Hewett TE, Myer GD, Ford KR, et al. Biomechanical measures of neuromuscular control and valgus loading of the knee predict anterior cruciate ligament injury risk in female athletes: a prospective study. Am J Sports Med. 2005;33(4):492501.

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8.

    Orishimo K, Kremenic I, Pappas E, Hagins M, Liederbach M. Comparison of landing biomechanics between male and female professional dancers. Am J Sports Med. 2009;37(11):21872193.

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 9.

    Orishimo K, Liederbach M, Kremenic I, Hagins M, Pappas E. Comparison of landing biomechanics between male and female dancers and athletes, part 1: influence of sex on risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury. Am J Sports Med. 2014;42(5):10821088.

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 10.

    Liederbach M, Dilgen F, Rose D. Incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injuries among elite ballet and modern dancers: a 5-year prospective study. Am J Sports Med. 2008;36(9):17791788.

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 11.

    Li S, Chow D. Multi-objective analysis for assessing simultaneous changes in regional spinal curvatures under backpack carriage in young adults. Ergonomics. 2016;59(11):14941504.

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 12.

    Padua D, Marshall S, Boling M, Thigpen C, Garrett WJ, Beutler A. The Landing Error Scoring System (LESS) is a valid and reliable clinical assessment tool of jump-landing biomechanics: THE JUMP-ACL study. Am J Sports Med. 2009;37(10):19962002.

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 13.

    Cohen J. Statistical Power Analysis for the Behavioral Sciences. 2nd ed. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates; 1988.

  • 14.

    Hansberger B, Acocelle S, Slater L, Hart J, Ambegaonkar J. Peak lower extremity landing kinematics in dancers and nondancers. J Athl Train. 2018;53(4), 379385.

    • Crossref
    • PubMed
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 15.

    Ford K, Myer G, Smith R, Vianello R, Seiwert S, Hewett T. A comparison of dynamic coronal plane excursion between matched male and female athletes when performing single leg landings. Clin Biomech. 2006;21(1):3340.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 16.

    Turner C, Crow S, Crowther T, et al. Preventing non-contact ACL injuries in female athletes: what can we learn from dancers? Phys Ther Sport. 2017;31:18.

  • 17.

    Dunning J. But First a School: The First 50 Years of the School of American Ballet. New York, NY: Viking Press; 1985.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 248 248 91
Full Text Views 75 75 4
PDF Downloads 25 25 1