Blood Flow Restriction Training in Clinical Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation: A Critically Appraised Paper

in International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training
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  • 1 The University of Toledo
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Focused Clinical Question: Is low-load exercise training with blood flow restriction (LL-BFR) more effective at increasing muscle strength compared to low-level (LL) or high-level (HL) exercise training in individuals with muscle weakness? Clinical Bottom Line: The results of the systematic review with meta-analysis concluded that there is evidence to support the belief that LL-BFR may increase muscle strength beyond LL exercise training alone, while HL training will produce greater strength increases compared to both LL-BFR and LL training.

The authors are with the School of Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, USA.

Jacobson (Jordan.Jacobson@Rockets.UToledo.edu) is corresponding author.
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