Exertional Rhabdomyolysis Following Noncontact Collegiate Recreational Activity: A Case Report

in International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training
Jenna Morogiello DAT, LAT, ATC, CSCS * , 1 , 2 and Rebekah Roessler MS, LAT, ATC, CES * , 2 , 3
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  • 1 United States Military Academy
  • 2 Georgia Southern University
  • 3 Maryville University
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A healthy 19-year-old male (body mass = 68.04 kg, height = 175.26 cm) participating in a collegiate intramural flag football tournament presented with unilateral gastrocnemius exercise-associated muscle cramps. He was given electrolytes, stretched, and returned to play. The exercise-associated muscle cramps progressed to his quadriceps bilaterally within 23 min of initial reported symptoms. Emergency medical services was activated and the patient was transported by ambulance to the emergency department, where he was diagnosed with acute exertional rhabdomyolysis. This case report explores the rarity of exertional rhabdomyolysis in a noncontact intramural sport and highlights the necessity for early recognition and treatment.

Morogiello is with the United States Military Academy, West Point, NY, USA. Roessler is with Maryville University, St. Louis, MO, USA. Both were previously with Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA, USA.

Roessler (roessler.rebekah@gmail.com) is corresponding author.
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