Are There Effective Intervention Strategies Available to Improve Physical Literacy in Adults? A Critically Appraised Topic

in International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training
Chloe McKay LAT, ATC*,1, Johanna M Hoch PhD, LAT, ATC*,1, and Deirdre Dlugonski PhD*,1
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  • 1 University of Kentucky
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Clinical Scenario: Physical inactivity among adults is prevalent. Physical literacy is a potential modifiable factor that, if targeted effectively, may increase physical activity and decrease the risk of health conditions that are associated with physical inactivity. Clinical Question: Are there effective intervention strategies available to improve physical literacy in adults? Summary of Key Findings: Two nonrandomized experimental studies were included. Both studies assessed changes in physical literacy before and after a physical literacy intervention using two different sets of physical literacy outcome measures. Clinical Bottom Line: There is currently Level 2, limited quality, patient-oriented evidence that indicates that physical literacy can be improved in an adult population. The creation of a valid and reliable physical literacy outcome measure for adults is a necessary next step to enhance knowledge about physical literacy among adults. Future research should use a randomized control trial design to test the efficacy of physical literacy interventions with valid and reliable outcome measures. Strength of Recommendation: There is Level 2, limited quality, patient-oriented evidence for physical literacy interventions among adults. Due to the limited number of, and lack of consistency between studies, the authors did not make a formal grade recommendation.

The authors are with the University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA.

Dlugonski (dee.dlugonski@uky.edu) is corresponding author.
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