Therapy Dog Intervention Decreases Stress and Increases Arousal in College Students

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Paul A. Cacolice Westfield State University

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Corinne M. Ebbs Westfield State University

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Clinical Question: What is the effect of CT intervention on the stress and arousal levels of undergraduate students? Clinical Bottom Line: There is Level A–B evidence showing that the use of therapy dogs decreases stress and elevates arousal in female undergraduate students, with little evidence available for other populations.

Cacolice is with the Athletic Training Program, Westfield State University, Westfield, MA, USA. Ebbs is with Ely Library, Westfield State University, Westfield, MA, USA.

Cacolice (pcacolice@westfield.ma.edu) is corresponding author.
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