The Clinical Relevance of the Accessory Peroneus Quartus in a Male Division I Collegiate Track Athlete

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Nina Robinson Tria Orthopedics

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Shannon L. David North Dakota State University

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Nicole A. German North Dakota State University

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Jennifer Swenson North Dakota State University

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A healthy 20-year-old Division I track athlete participated in out-of-season practice and experienced inflammation on mid-lateral aspect of his right calcaneus. The patient modified his weekly training program, and a magnetic resonance imaging revealed the presence of an accessory peroneus quartus. This muscle is present in around 5.2% of the population. The pathological symptoms cause pain, snapping, and synovitis. Literature shows a higher prevalence of the accessory peroneus quartus muscle in males of European/American descent and in the right lower leg. Symptoms include peroneal tears, decrease in range of motion, and pain of the ankle and foot.

Robinson is with TRIA Orthopedics Bloomington Outreach, Bloomington, MN, USA. David, German, and Swenson are with North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, USA.

David (Shannon.David@ndsu.edu) is corresponding author.
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