The Impact of Concussion Education on Injury Disclosure in High School Athletes: A Critically Appraised Topic

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Alyson Hansbarger Temple University

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Ryan Thomson Temple University

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Jamie L. Mansell Temple University

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Ryan T. Tierney Temple University

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Clinical Scenario: Sport-related concussions are common injuries during sport-related activities. Evaluations of these injuries involve symptom reporting. Unfortunately, concussion symptoms are widely underreported by athletes, and can lead to longer recovery times. Concussion education programs were created to encourage reporting of symptoms by athletes. Clinical Question: Does concussion education impact injury disclosure in high school athletes? Summary of Key Findings: Three studies were included in this appraisal. Two studies utilized an educational lecture, and one study utilized an informational video providing the concussion education. All three studies found significant increases in injury history disclosure from pre-education to immediate post-education. Clinical Bottom Line: There is moderate evidence to support the idea that education has a positive impact on concussion reporting behaviors. These studies found positive results immediately following concussion education therefore it may be beneficial to provide concussion education several times a year. Strength of Recommendation: There is Level B evidence to support the idea that implementing concussion education will impact concussion reporting behaviors as it pertains to injury history disclosure.

Hansbarger and Thomson are with the Department of Kinesiology, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Mansell and Tierney are with the Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Hansbarger (alysonhansbarger@gmail.com) is corresponding author.

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