An Investigation of Athletic Trainers’ Emergency Management Practices for Equipment-Intensive Sports

in International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training
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In 2015, new practice recommendations to remove equipment prior to transport when cervical spine injury is suspected were released. The purpose of this study was to determine current emergency management practices and perceptions of the new practice recommendation. We received completed mixed-method surveys from 143 athletic trainers practicing in the Mid-Atlantic region (response rate = 10.11%). The majority of respondents stated that the number of personnel required, along with the training and time to practice equipment removal, were barriers to implementation. Requiring assistance from emergency medical services (EMS) was common, but many failed to practice with local EMS. Emergency management procedures should be appropriate given the resources (personnel and training) available. Collaboration between athletic trainers and EMS is needed.

Boergers is an associate professor at Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ. Bowman is an associate professor at University of Lynchburg, Lynchburg, VA. Sgherza is a clinical trial assistant at Innocrin Pharmaceuticals, Durham, NC. Montjoy is an athletic trainer/physician extender at Columbia Orthopedics, Englewood, NJ. Lu is an outreach certified athletic trainer for ATI Physical Therapy, North East, MD. O’Brien is dean of Health Sciences and an associate clinical professor of sports medicine at King’s College, Wilkes-Barre, PA.

Boergers (Richard.boergers@shu.edu) is corresponding author.
International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training
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