The Elevation Training Mask: A Critically Appraised Topic

in International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training
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Clinical Question: Does the elevation training mask (ETM) increase VO2max in healthy individuals who are physically active? Clinical Bottom Line: The current best evidence shows no difference in VO2max improvement compared to training without wearing the ETM while following an exercise program. Several studies demonstrated improvement in measures of respiratory function when wearing the ETM. Further research should investigate changes in physiological variables other than VO2max, specifically those related to respiratory function.

The authors are with the Sports Medicine Assessment Research Testing (SMART) Laboratory, George Mason University, Manassas, VA, USA.

J.R. Martin (jmarti38@gmu.edu) is corresponding author.
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