Head Impact Characteristics Based on Player Position in Collegiate Soccer Athletes

in International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training
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  • 1 University of Lynchburg
  • 2 Brigham and Women’s Hospital
  • 3 Harvard Medical School
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The study objective was to determine the magnitude and frequency of head impacts in NCAA Division III soccer athletes based on player position and type of play (offense, defense, transition). Across player position, male and female soccer defenders sustained the most head impacts (males IR = 18.89, 95% CI = 16.89–20.89; females IR = 8.45, 95% CI = 7.25–9.64; IRR = 2.23, 95% CI = 1.87–2.67). The study revealed a nonstatistically significant interaction between sex, player position, and type of play for both linear (p = .42) and rotational accelerations (p = .16). Defenders sustained the majority of the head impacts in the study sample, suggesting preventative initiatives should be focused on back row players.

Nelson, Daidone, Bradney, and Bowman are with the Department of Athletic Training, University of Lynchburg, Lynchburg, VA, USA. Breedlove is with the Center for Clinical Spectroscopy, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Bowman (Bowman.t@lynchburg.edu) is corresponding author.
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