Collegiate Athletic Trainers’ Use of Behavioral Health Screening Tools

in International Journal of Athletic Therapy and Training

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Taylor B. ChandlerIndiana State University, Terre Haute, IN, USA

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Matthew J. RiveraIndiana State University, Terre Haute, IN, USA

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Elizabeth R. NeilTemple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA

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Lindsey E. EbermanIndiana State University, Terre Haute, IN, USA

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Screening for behavioral health (BH) concerns is important for early identification, referral, and management. The purpose of this study was to examine collegiate athletic trainers use of BH screening tools. We used a cross-sectional design with a web-based survey. Approximately 49% (n = 198/405) of participants used BH screening tools in their practice; the most used tools were PHQ-9 (n = 112/198, 56.6%) and GAD-7 (n = 54/198, 27.3%). Practice integration considerations and practice advancements occurred as a result of BH screening. Given rising incidence and severity of BH conditions in collegiate athletics, more training on screening and prevention is needed.

Chandler (tchandler6@sycamores.indstate.edu) is corresponding author.

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