Social Media Use Among Olympians and Sport Journalists in Hungary

in International Journal of Sport Communication
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  • 1 University of Physical Education, Hungary
  • 2 Bradley University, USA
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The Olympic Games are among the most followed events in the world, so athletes who participate there are exceptionally interesting for the media. This research investigated Olympians’ social media use, sport journalists’ attitudes about Olympians’ social media use, and the role of social media in the relationship between Olympians and sport journalists in Hungary. The findings suggest that most Hungarian Olympians do not think that being on social media is an exceptionally key issue in their life, and a significant portion of them do not have public social media pages. However, sport journalists would like to see more information about athletes on social media platforms. The Hungarian case offers not only a general understanding of the athlete–journalist relationship, and the role of social media in it, but also insight into the specific features of the phenomenon in a state-supported, hybrid sport economy.

Kovacs and Doczi are with the Dept. of Social Sciences, University of Physical Education, Budapest, Hungary. Antunovic is with the Dept. of Communication, Bradley University, IL.

Kovacs (kovacs.agnes@tf.hu) is corresponding author.
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