Migrating to Social Networks While Watching Televised Sports: A Case Study of the Effect of Enjoyment on Second-Screen Usage During the World Cup

in International Journal of Sport Communication
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  • 1 Max Stern Yezreel Valley College
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The World Cup is among the most popular televised sport events. This case study examined how enjoyment from and transportation into World Cup broadcasts affected WhatsApp use on a second screen. The authors hypothesized a negative correlation between World Cup enjoyment and WhatsApp use (both match related and unrelated), mediated by transportation into the match. Based on an online survey of 454 participants, they found that the more enjoyment the viewers experienced, the less they used WhatsApp for non-match-related purposes and (contrary to their hypothesis) the more they used it for match-related purposes. It was also found that the more enjoyment viewers experienced, the more transported they were into the match, leading to higher match-related and lower non-match-related WhatsApp use.

The authors are with Max Stern Yezreel Valley College, Yezreel Valley, Israel.

Elishar-Malka (veredm@yvc.ac.il) is corresponding author.
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