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The effects of a commercial sports drink on performance in high-intensity cycling was investigated. Nine well-trained subjects were asked to complete a set amount of work as fast as possible (time trial) following 24 h of dietary (subjects were provided with food, energy 57.4 ± 2.4 kcal/kg and carbohydrate 9.1 ± 0.4 g/kg) and exercise control. During exercise, subjects were provided with 14 mL/kg of either 6% carbohydrate-electrolyte (CHO-E) solution or carbohydrate-free placebo (P). Results showed that subjects’ performances did not greatly improve (time, 62:34 ± 6:44 min:sec (CHO-E) vs. 62:40 ± 5:35 min:sec (P); average power output, 283.0 ± 25.0 W (CHO-E) vs. 282.9 ± 29.3 W (P), P > 0.05) while consuming the sports drink. It was concluded that CHO-E consumption throughout a 1-h time trial, following a pre-exercise dietary regimen designed to optimize glucose availability, did not improve time or power output to a greater degree than P in well-trained cyclists.

B. Desbrow, S. Anderson, J. Barrett, and E. Rao are with the School of Health Science, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD 9726, Australia. M. Hargreaves is with the School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, VIC 3125, Australia.