Protein Intake for Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy with Resistance Training in Seniors

in International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
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Variability in protein consumption may influence muscle mass changes induced by resistance exercise training (RET). We sought to administer a post-exercise protein supplement and determine if daily protein intake variability affected variability in muscle mass gains. Men (N = 22) and women (N = 30) ranging in age from 60 to 69 y participated in a 12-wk RET program. At each RET session, participants consumed a post-exercise drink (0.4 g/kg lean mass protein). RET resulted in significant increases in lean mass (1.1 ±1.5 kg), similar between sexes (P > 0.05). Variability in mean daily protein intake was not associated with change in lean mass (r < 0.10, P > 0.05). The group with the highest protein intake (1.35 g · kg−1 · d−1, n = 8) had similar (P > 0.05) changes in lean mass as the group with the lowest daily protein intake (0.72 g · kg−1 · d−1, n = 9). These data suggest that variability in total daily protein intake does not affect variability in lean mass gains with RET in the context of post-exercise protein supplementation.

Andrews is with the Johns Hopkins Weight Management Center, Lutherville, MD 21093. MacLean is with the Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Sudbury, ON P3E 2C6. Riechman is with the Dept of Health and Kinesiology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4243.

International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
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