Dietary Microperiodization in Elite Female and Male Runners and Race Walkers During a Block of High Intensity Precompetition Training

in International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
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We investigated one week of dietary microperiodization in elite female (n = 23) and male (n = 15) runners and race-walkers by examining the frequency of training sessions and recovery periods conducted with recommended carbohydrate (CHO) and protein availability. Food and training diaries were recorded in relation to HARD (intense or >90min sessions; KEY) versus RECOVERY days (other-than KEY sessions; EASY). The targets for amount and timing of CHO and protein around KEY sessions were based on current nutrition recommendations. Relative daily energy and CHO intake was significantly (p < .05) higher in males (224 ± 26 kJ/kg/d, 7.3 ± 1.4 g/kg/d CHO) than females (204 ± 29 kJ/kg/d, 6.2 ± 1.1 g/kg/d CHO) on HARD days. However, when adjusted for training volume (km), there was no sex-based difference in CHO intake daily (HARD: 0.42 ± 0.14 vs 0.39 ± 0.15 g/kg/km). Females appeared to periodize energy and protein intake with greater intakes on HARD training days (204 ± 29 vs 187 ± 35 kJ/kg/d, p = .004; 2.0 ± 0.3 vs 1.9 ± 0.3 g/kg/d protein, p = .013), while males did not periodize intakes. Females showed a pattern of periodization of postexercise CHO for KEY vs EASY (0.9 ± 0.4 vs 0.5 ± 0.3 g/kg; p < .05) while males had higher intakes but only modest periodization (1.3 ± 0.9 vs 1.0 ± 0.4; p = .32). There was only modest evidence from female athletes of systematic microperiodization of eating patterns to meet contemporary sports nutrition guidelines. While this pattern of periodization was absent in males, in general they consumed more energy and CHO daily and around training sessions compared with females. Elite endurance athletes do not seem to systematically follow the most recent sports nutrition guidelines of periodized nutrition.

Heikura is with the Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Australia. Burke is with Mary MacKillop Institute and Sports Nutrition, Australian Institute of Sport, Canberra, Australia. Mero is with Biology of Physical Activity, University of Jyvaskyla, Finland. Uusitalo is with the Dept. of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki, Helsinki University Central Hospital and University of Helsinki, Finland. Stellingwerff is with the Canadian Sport Institute Pacific, Victoria, Canada.

Address author correspondence to Ida Heikura at ida.heikura@myacu.edu.au.