Effects of Different Vitamin C–Enriched Collagen Derivatives on Collagen Synthesis

in International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
Restricted access

Purchase article

USD $24.95

Student 1 year subscription

USD $87.00

1 year subscription

USD $116.00

Student 2 year subscription

USD $165.00

2 year subscription

USD $215.00

Nutritional strategies to improve connective tissue collagen synthesis have garnered significant interest, although the scientific validity of these interventions lags behind their hype. This study was designed to determine the effects of three forms of collagen on N-terminal peptide of procollagen and serum amino acid levels. A total of 10 recreationally active males completed a randomized double-blinded crossover design study consuming either placebo or 15 g of vitamin C–enriched gelatin or hydrolyzed collagen (HC), or gummy containing equal parts of gelatin and HC. Supplements were consumed 1 hr before 6 min of jump rope. Blood samples were collected immediately prior to supplement consumption and 4 hr after jump rope. A subset of blood samples (n = 4) was collected for amino acid analysis 1 hr after ingestion. Consumption of an equivalent dose of each supplement increased amino acids in the circulation similarly across all interventions. N-terminal peptide of procollagen levels tended to increase ∼20% from baseline in the gelatin and HC interventions but not the placebo or gummy. These results suggest that vitamin C–enriched gelatin and HC supplementation may improve collagen synthesis when taken 1 hr prior to exercise. However, large variability was observed, which precluded significance for any treatment.

The authors are with the Department of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, University of California Davis, Davis, CA.

Baar (kbaar@ucdavis.edu) is corresponding author.
International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
Article Sections
References
  • ClarkK.L.SebastianelliW.FlechsenharK.R.AukermannD.F.MezaF.MillardR.L.AlbertA. (2008). 24-Week study on the use of collagen hydrolysate as a dietary supplement in athletes with activity-related joint pain. Current Medical Research and Opinion 24(5) 14851496. PubMed ID: 18416885 doi:10.1185/030079908X291967

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • DanielH. (2004). Molecular and integrative physiology of intestinal peptide transport. Annual Review of Physiology 66361384. PubMed ID: 14977407 doi:10.1146/annurev.physiol.66.032102.144149

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • EastoeJ.E. (1955). The amino acid composition of mammalian collagen and gelatin. Biochemical Journal 61(4) 589600. PubMed ID: 13276342 doi:10.1042/bj0610589

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Gómez-GuillénM.C.GiménezB.López-CaballeroM.E. & MonteroM.P. (2011). Functional and bioactive properties of collagen and gelatin from alternative sources: A review. Food Hydrocolloids 25(8) 18131827. doi:10.1016/j.foodhyd.2011.02.007

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • HansenM.KongsgaardM.HolmL.SkovgaardD.MagnussonS.P.QvortrupK.KjaerM. (2009). Effect of estrogen on tendon collagen synthesis, tendon structural characteristics, and biomechanical properties in postmenopausal women. Journal of Applied Physiology 106(4) 13851393. doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.90935.2008

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • IgwemmarmN.C.KolawoleS.A. & ImranI.A. (2013). Effect of heating on vitamin C content of some selected vegetables. International Journal of Scientific & Technology Research 2(11) 209212.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • IwaiK.HasegawaT.TaguchiY.MorimatsuF.SatoK.NakamuraY.OhtsukiK. (2005). Identification of food-derived collagen peptides in human blood after oral ingestion of gelatin hydrolysates. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 53(16) 65316536. PubMed ID: 16076145 doi:10.1021/jf050206p

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • JaquesT. (2008). When an icon stumbles: The Ribena issue mismanaged. Corporate Communications: An International Journal 13(4) 394406. doi:10.1108/13563280810914829

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • KatarzynaD. & WalczakP. (2009). Collagen hydrolysates as a new dietary supplement. Food Chemistry and Biotechnology 738391.

  • KjaerM. (2004). Role of extracellular matrix in adaptation of tendon and skeletal muscle to mechanical loading. Physiological Reviews 84(2) 649698. PubMed ID: 15044685 doi:10.1152/physrev.00031.2003

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • MatsudaN.KoyamaY.HosakaY.UedaH.WatanabeT.ArayaT.TakehanaK. (2006). Effects of ingestion of collagen peptide on collagen fibrils and glycosaminoglycans in the dermis. Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology 52(3) 211215. PubMed ID: 16967766 doi:10.3177/jnsv.52.211

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • McAlindonT.E.NuiteM.KrishnanN.RuthazerR.PriceL.L.BursteinD.FlechsenharK. (2011). Change in knee osteoarthritis cartilage detected by delayed gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance imaging following treatment with collagen hydrolysate: A pilot randomized controlled trial. Osteoarthritis Cartilage 19(4) 399405. PubMed ID: 21251991 doi:10.1016/j.joca.2011.01.001

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • MengQ.H.IrwinW.C.FesserJ. & MasseyK.L. (2005). Interference of ascorbic acid with chemical analytes. Annals of Clinical Biochemistry 42(Pt 6) 475477. PubMed ID: 16259800 doi:10.1258/000456305774538274

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • OesserS.AdamM.BabelW. & SeifertJ. (1999). Oral administration of (14)C labeled gelatin hydrolysate leads to an accumulation of radioactivity in cartilage of mice (C57/BL). Journal of Nutrition 129(10) 18911895. PubMed ID: 10498764 doi:10.1093/jn/129.10.1891

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • OharaH.MatsumotoH.ItoK.IwaiK. & SatoK. (2007). Comparison of quantity and structures of hydroxyproline-containing peptides in human blood after oral ingestion of gelatin hydrolysates from different sources. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 55(4) 15321535. PubMed ID: 17253720 doi:10.1021/jf062834s

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • OrumO.HansenM.JensenC.H.SørensenH.A.JensenL.B.Hørslev-PetersenK. & TeisnerB. (1996). Procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (PINP) as an indicator of type I collagen metabolism: ELISA development, reference interval, and hypovitaminosis D induced hyperparathyroidism. Bone 19(2) 157163. PubMed ID: 8853860 doi:10.1016/8756-3282(96)00165-2

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • ParryD.A. (1988). The molecular and fibrillar structure of collagen and its relationship to the mechanical properties of connective tissue. Biophysical Chemistry 29(1–2) 195209. doi:10.1016/0301-4622(88)87039-X

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • PelegM. (2017). Theoretical study of aerobic vitamin C loss kinetics during commercial heat preservation and storage. Food Research International 102246255. PubMed ID: 29195945 doi:10.1016/j.foodres.2017.10.008

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • PollmannD.SiepmannS.GeppertR.WerneckeK.D.PossingerK. & LüftnerD. (2007). The amino-terminal propeptide (PINP) of type I collagen is a clinically valid indicator of bone turnover and extent of metastatic spread in osseous metastatic breast cancer. Anticancer Research 27(4A) 18531862. PubMed ID: 17649784

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • ShawG.Lee-BarthelA.RossM.L.WangB. & BaarK. (2017). Vitamin C-enriched gelatin supplementation before intermittent activity augments collagen synthesis. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 105(1) 136143. PubMed ID: 27852613 doi:10.3945/ajcn.116.138594

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • ShigemuraY.AkabaS.KawashimaE.ParkE.Y.NakamuraY. & SatoK. (2011). Identification of a novel food-derived collagen peptide, hydroxyprolyl-glycine, in human peripheral blood by pre-column derivatisation with phenyl isothiocyanate. Food Chemistry 129(3) 10191024. PubMed ID: 25212331 doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2011.05.066

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • WestD.W.Lee-BarthelA.McIntyreT.ShamimB.LeeC.A. & BaarK. (2015). The exercise-induced biochemical milieu enhances collagen content and tensile strength of engineered ligaments. The Journal of Physiology 593(20) 46654675. PubMed ID: 26282066 doi:10.1113/JP270737

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
Article Metrics
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 236 236 236
Full Text Views 28 28 28
PDF Downloads 18 18 18
Altmetric Badge
PubMed
Google Scholar