Drinking Behavior and Exercise-Thermal Stress: Role of Drink Carbonation

in International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
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This study investigated the influence of drink carbonation and carbohydrate content on ad libitum drinking behavior and body fluid and electrolyte responses during prolonged exercise in the heat. Eight competitive male runners completed three 2-hr treadmill runs at 60% VO2max in an environmental chamber maintained at 30 C° and 40% RH. Three test drinks were used: 8% carbohydrate, low carbonation (8%-C); 8% carbohydrate, noncarbonated (8%-NC), and water (0%-NC). Blood samples were taken preexercise (0), at 60 and 120 min of exercise, and at 60 min of recovery (+60 min). The data suggest that while reports of heartburn tend to be higher on 8% carbohydrate drinks than on 0%-NC, this does not appear to be a function of drink carbonation. Similarly, the increased frequency of heartbum did not significantly reduce fluid consumption either during exercise or during a 60-min recovery period. Importantly, no differences were observed between fluid and electrolyte, or thermoregulatory responses to the three sport drinks. Thus, consumption of low-carbonation beverages does not appear to significantly influence drinking behavior or the related physiological responses during prolonged exercise in the heat.

M.S. Hickey is with the Human Performance Laboratory, 371 Sports Medicine Building, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858. D.L. Costill is with the Human Performance Laboratory, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306. S.W. Trappe is with the Human Performance Laboratory, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306. Direct correspondence to D.L. Costill.