Single and Serial Carbohydrate Mouth Rinsing Do Not Improve Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Performance in Soccer Players

in International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
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  • 1 Laboratory of Nutrition, Exercise and Health (LaNES), School of Medicine, Federal University of Uberlandia (UFU), Uberlandia, Brazil
  • | 2 School of Medicine, Federal University of Uberlandia (UFU), Uberlandia, Brazil
  • | 3 Laboratory of Cardiorespiratory and Metabolic Physiology, Federal University of Uberlandia (UFU), Uberlandia, Brazil
  • | 4 Applied Physiology and Nutrition Research Group, School of Physical Education and Sport, Rheumatology Division, Faculdade de Medicina FMUSP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil
  • | 5 Institute of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Faculty of Medicine FMUSP, University of São Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil
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Carbohydrate (CHO) mouth rinsing seems to improve performance in exercises lasting 30–60 min. However, its effects on intermittent exercise are unclear. It is also unknown whether serial CHO mouth rinses can promote additional ergogenic effects when compared with a single mouth rinse. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of single and serial CHO mouth rinses on Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1) performance in soccer players. In a randomized, crossover, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, 12 male (18.9 ± 0.5 years) soccer players performed eight serial mouth rinses under three different conditions: placebo solution only (noncaloric juice), seven placebo mouth rinses plus a single CHO mouth rinse (8% maltodextrin), or eight CHO mouth rinses (8-CHO). Following the final mouth rinse, individuals performed the Yo-Yo IR1 test to evaluate the maximal aerobic endurance performance measured via total distance covered. There were no differences in Yo-Yo IR1 performance between sessions (p = .32; single CHO mouth rinse (8% maltodextrin): 1,198 ± 289 m, eight CHO mouth rinses: 1,256 ± 253 m, placebo: 1,086 ± 284 m). In conclusion, single and serial CHO mouth rinsing did not improve performance during the Yo-Yo IR1 for soccer players. These data suggest that CHO mouth rinsing is not an effective ergogenic strategy for intermittent exercise performance irrespective of the number of rinses.

de Oliveira (erick_po@yahoo.com.br) is corresponding author, https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8989-8344

Supplementary Materials

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