A Comparison of Different Modes of Morning Priming Exercise on Afternoon Performance

in International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance

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Mark Russell
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Aden King
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Richard. M. Bracken
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Christian. J. Cook
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Thibault Giroud
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Liam. P. Kilduff
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Purpose:

To assess the effects of different modes of morning (AM) exercise on afternoon (PM) performance and salivary hormone responses in professional rugby union players.

Methods:

On 4 occasions (randomized, crossover design), 15 professional rugby players provided AM (~8 AM) and PM (~2 PM) saliva samples before PM assessments of countermovement-jump height, reaction time, and repeated-sprint ability. Control (passive rest), weights (bench press: 5 × 10 repetitions, 75% 1-repetition maximum, 90-s intraset recovery), cycling (6 × 6-s maximal sprint cycling, 7.5% body mass load, 54-s intraset recovery), and running (6 × 40-m maximal sprints, 20-s intraset recovery) interventions preceded (~5 h) PM testing.

Results:

PM sprint performance improved (P < .05) after weights (>0.15 ± 0.19 s, >2.04% ± 2.46%) and running (>0.15 ± 0.17 s, >2.12% ± 2.22%) but not cycling (P > .05). PM jump height increased after cycling (0.012 ± 0.009 m, 2.31% ± 1.76%, P < .001) and running (0.020 ± 0.009 m, 3.90% ± 1.79%, P < .001) but not weights (P = .936). Reaction time remained unchanged between trials (P = .379). Relative to control (131 ± 21 pg/mL), PM testosterone was greater in weights (21 ± 23 pg/mL, 17% ± 18%, P = .002) and running (28 ± 26 pg/mL, 22% ± 20%, P = .001) but not cycling (P = .072). Salivary cortisol was unaffected by AM exercise (P = .540).

Conclusions:

All modes of AM exercise improved at least 1 marker of PM performance, but running appeared the most beneficial to professional rugby union players. A rationale therefore exists for preceding PM competition with AM exercise.

Russell is with the Health and Life Sciences Dept, Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK. King, Bracken, and Kilduff are with the Applied Sports Technology Exercise and Medicine Research Centre (A-STEM), Swansea University, Swansea, UK. Cook is with the School of Sport, Health and Exercise Sciences, Bangor University, Bangor, UK. Giroud is with Biarritz Olympique Rugby, Parc Des Sports Aguilera, Biarritz, France.

Address author correspondence to Liam Kilduff at l.kilduff@swansea.ac.uk.
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