Enhancement of High-Intensity Actions and Physical Performance During a Simulated Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Competition With a Moderate Dose of Caffeine

in International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance

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Francisco Javier Diaz-Lara
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Juan del Coso
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Javier Portillo
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Francisco Areces
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Jose Manuel García
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Javier Abián-Vicén
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Context:

Although caffeine is one of the most commonly used substances in combat sports, information about its ergogenic effects on these disciplines is very limited.

Purpose:

To determine the effectiveness of ingesting a moderate dose of caffeine to enhance overall performance during a simulated Brazilian jiu-jitsu (BJJ) competition.

Methods:

Fourteen elite BJJ athletes participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled experimental design. In a random order, the athletes ingested either 3 mg/kg body mass of caffeine or a placebo (cellulose, 0 mg/kg) and performed 2 simulated BJJ combats (with 20 min rest between them), following official BJJ rules. Specific physical tests such as maximal handgrip dynamometry, maximal height during a countermovement jump, permanence during a maximal static-lift test, peak power in a bench-press exercise, and blood lactate concentration were measured at 3 specific times: before the first combat and immediately after the first and second combats. The combats were video-recorded to analyze fight actions.

Results:

After the caffeine ingestion, participants spent more time in offensive actions in both combats and revealed higher blood lactate values (P < .05). Performance in all physical tests carried out before the first combat was enhanced with caffeine (P < .05), and some improvements remained after the first combat (eg, maximal static-lift test and bench-press exercise; P < .05). After the second combat, the values in all physical tests were similar between caffeine and placebo.

Conclusions:

Caffeine might be an effective ergogenic aid for improving intensity and physical performance during successive elite BJJ combats.

Diaz-Lara, Portillo, García, and Abián-Vicén are with the Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Toledo, Spain. del Coso and Areces are with the Sport Science Inst, Camilo José Cela University, Madrid, Spain.

Address author correspondence to Javier Abián-Vicén at javier.abian@uclm.es.
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