Effect of Repeated Active Recovery During a High-Intensity Interval-Training Shock Microcycle on Markers of Fatigue

in International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
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Purpose:

To investigate the effect of repeated use of active recovery during a 4-d shock microcycle with 7 high-intensity interval-training (HIT) sessions on markers of fatigue.

Methods:

Eight elite male junior tennis players (age 15.1 ± 1.4 y) with an international ranking between 59 and 907 (International Tennis Federation) participated in this study. After each training session, they completed 15 min of either moderate jogging (active recovery [ACT]) or passive recovery (PAS) with a crossover design, which was interrupted by a 4-mo washout period. Countermovement-jump (CMJ) height, serum concentration of creatine kinase (CK), delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), and perceived recovery and stress (Short Recovery and Stress Scale) were measured 24 h before and 24 h after the training program.

Results:

The HIT shock microcycle induced a large decrease in CMJ performance (ACT: effect size [ES] = –1.39, P < .05; PAS: ES = –1.42, P < .05) and perceived recovery (ACT: ES = –1.79, P < .05; PAS: ES = –2.39, P < .05), as well as a moderate to large increase in CK levels (ACT: ES = 0.76, P > .05; PAS: ES = 0.81, P >.05), DOMS (ACT: ES = 2.02, P < .05; PAS: ES = 2.17, P < .05), and perceived stress (ACT: ES = 1.98, P < .05; PAS: ES = 3.06, P < .05), compared with the values before the intervention. However, no significant recovery intervention × time interactions or meaningful differences in changes were noted in any of the markers between ACT and PAS.

Conclusions:

Repeated use of individualized ACT, consisting of 15 min of moderate jogging, after finishing each training session during an HIT shock microcycle did not affect exercise-induced fatigue.

Wiewelhove, Raeder, Kellmann, and Ferrauti are with the Faculty of Sport Science, Ruhr-University, Bochum, Germany. Meyer is with the Inst of Sports and Preventive Medicine, Saarland University, Saarbrücken, Germany. Pfeiffer is with the Inst of Sports Science, Johannes-Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany.

Address author correspondence to Thimo Wiewelhove at thimo.wiewelhove@ruhr-uni-bochum.de.