A Review of the Internal and External Physiological Demands Associated With Batting in Cricket

in International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
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Cricket is a popular international team sport with various game formats ranging from long-duration multiday tests to short-duration Twenty20 game play. The role of batsmen is critical to all game formats, with differing physiological demands imposed during each format. Investigation of the physiological demands imposed during cricket batting has historically been neglected, with much of the research focusing on bowling responses and batting technique. A greater understanding of the physiological demands of the batting role in cricket is required to assist strength and conditioning professionals and coaches with the design of training plans, recovery protocols, and player-management strategies. This brief review provides an updated synthesis of the literature examining the internal (eg, metabolic demands and heart rate) and external (eg, activity work rates) physiological responses to batting in the various game formats, as well as simulated play and small-sided-games training. Although few studies have been done in this area, the summary of data provides important insight regarding physiological responses to batting and highlights that more research on this topic is required. Future research is recommended to combine internal and external measures during actual game play, as well as comparing different game formats and playing levels. In addition, understanding the relationship between batting technique and physiological responses is warranted to gain a more holistic understanding of batting in cricket, as well as to develop appropriate coaching and training strategies.

Scanlan, Berkelmans, and Kean are with the School of Medical and Applied Sciences, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, QLD, Australia. Vickery is with the Dept of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation, Northumbria University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, United Kingdom.

Address author correspondence to Aaron Scanlan at a.scanlan@cqu.edu.au.