Monitoring Elite Soccer Players’ External Loads Using Real-Time Data

in International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
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Purpose: To assess the validity of measuring locomotor activities and PlayerLoad using real-time (RT) data collection during soccer training. Methods: Twenty-nine English soccer players participated. Each player wore the same MEMS device (Micromechanical Electrical Systems; S5, Optimeye; CatapultSports, Melbourne, Australia) during 21 training sessions (N = 331 data sets) in the 2015–16 and 2016–17 seasons. An RT receiver (TRX; Catapultsports, Melbourne, Australia) was used to collect the locomotor activities and PlayerLoad data in RT and compared with the postevent downloaded (PED) data. PlayerLoad and locomotor activities (total distance covered; total high-speed running distance covered, >5.5#x00A0;m/s; total sprinting distance covered, >7 m/s; maximum velocity) were analyzed. Results: Correlations were near perfect for all variables analyzed (r = .98–1.00), with a varied level of noise between RT and PED also (0.3–9.7% coefficient of variation). Conclusions: Locomotor activities and PlayerLoad can use both RT and PED concurrently to quantify a player’s physical output during a training session. Caution should be taken with higher-velocity-based locomotor activities during RT compared to PED.

The author (steve.barrett@hulltigers.com) is with the Sports Medicine and Science Dept and Dept of Sport, Health and Exercise Science, Hull City FC, Kingston Upon Hull, United Kingdom.

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