The Unsuitability of Energy Expenditure Derived From Microtechnology for Assessing Internal Load in Collision-Based Activities

Click name to view affiliation

Jamie Highton
Search for other papers by Jamie Highton in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Thomas Mullen
Search for other papers by Thomas Mullen in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Jonathan Norris
Search for other papers by Jonathan Norris in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Chelsea Oxendale
Search for other papers by Chelsea Oxendale in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Craig Twist
Search for other papers by Craig Twist in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Restricted access

This aim of this study was to examine the validity of energy expenditure derived from microtechnology when measured during a repeated-effort rugby protocol. Sixteen male rugby players completed a repeated-effort protocol comprising 3 sets of 6 collisions during which movement activity and energy expenditure (EEGPS) were measured using microtechnology. In addition, energy expenditure was estimated from open-circuit spirometry (EEVO2). While related (r = .63, 90%CI .08–.89), there was a systematic underestimation of energy expenditure during the protocol (–5.94 ± 0.67 kcal/min) for EEGPS (7.2 ± 1.0 kcal/min) compared with EEVO2 (13.2 ± 2.3 kcal/min). High-speed-running distance (r = .50, 95%CI –.66 to .84) was related to EEVO2, while PlayerLoad was not (r = .37, 95%CI –.81 to .68). While metabolic power might provide a different measure of external load than other typically used microtechnology metrics (eg, high-speed running, PlayerLoad), it underestimates energy expenditure during intermittent team sports that involve collisions.

The authors are with the Dept of Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Chester, Chester, UK.

Address author correspondence to Craig Twist at c.twist@chester.ac.uk.
  • Collapse
  • Expand