The Relationship Between Variables in Wearable Microtechnology Devices and Cricket Fast-Bowling Intensity

in International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
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To date, the monitoring of fast-bowling workloads across training and competition environments has been limited to counting total balls bowled. However, bowling at faster velocities is likely to require greater effort while also placing greater load on the bowler. This study investigated the relationship between prescribed effort and microtechnology outputs in fast bowlers to ascertain whether the technology could provide a more refined measure of workload. Twelve high-performing fast bowlers (mean ± SD age 20.3 ± 2.2 y) participated in the study. Each bowler bowled 6 balls at prescribed bowling intensities of 60%, 70%, 85%, and 100%. The relationships between microtechnology outputs, prescribed intensity, and ball velocity were determined using polynomial regression. Very large relationships were observed between prescribed effort and ball velocity for peak PlayerLoad™ (R = .83 ± .19 and .82 ± .20). The PlayerLoad across lower ranges of prescribed effort exhibited a higher coefficient of variation (CV) (60% = 19.0% [17.0–23.0%]), while the CV at higher ranges of prescribed effort was lower (100% = 7.3% [6.4–8.5%]). Routinely used wearable microtechnology devices offer opportunities to examine workload and intensity in cricket fast bowlers outside the normal metrics reported. They offer a useful tool for prescribing and monitoring bowling intensity and workload in elite fast bowlers.

McNamara is with Sydney Sports & Exercise Physiology and Sydney Thunder, Sydney, Australia. Gabbett is with Gabbett Performance Solutions, Brisbane, Australia, and the Inst for Resilient Regions, University of Southern Queensland, Ipswich, Australia. Blanch is with Brisbane Lions Football Club, Brisbane, Australia, and the School of Allied Health Services, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Australia. Kelly is with the School of Human Movement & Nutrition Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.

McNamara (dean@ssep.com.au) is corresponding author.
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