Postmatch Perceived Exertion, Feeling, and Wellness in Professional Soccer Players

in International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
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Purpose: To assess postmatch perceived exertion, feeling, and wellness according to the match outcome (winning, drawing, or losing) in professional soccer players. Methods: In total, 12 outfield players were followed during 52 official matches where the outcomes (win, draw, or lose) were noted. Following each match, players completed both a 10-point Borg scale modified by Foster and an 11-point Hardy and Rejeski scale rating of perceived feeling. Rating of perceived sleep quality, stress, fatigue, and muscle soreness was collected separately on a 7-point scale the day following each match. Results: Player rating of perceived exertion was higher by a very large magnitude following a loss compared with a draw or a win and higher by a small magnitude after a draw compared with a win. Players felt more pleasure after a win compared with a draw or loss and more displeasure after a loss compared with draw. The players reported a largely and moderately better perceived sleep quality, less stress, and fatigue following a win compared with a draw or a loss and a moderately bad perceived sleep quality, higher stress, and fatigue following a draw compared with a loss. In contrast, only a trivial-small change was observed in perceived muscle soreness between all outcomes. Conclusion: Match outcomes moderately to largely affect rating of perceived exertion, feeling, sleep quality, stress, and fatigue, whereas perceived muscle soreness remains high regardless of the match outcome. However, winning a match decreases the strain and improves both pleasure and wellness in professional soccer players.

The authors are with the EM2S 15JSS01: Education, Motricity, Sport and Health, High Inst of Sport and Physical Education, University of Sfax, Sfax, Tunisia.

Moalla (wassim.moalla@gmail.com) is corresponding author.
International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
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