Higher- Versus Lower-Intensity Strength-Training Taper: Effects on Neuromuscular Performance

in International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
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Purpose: To investigate the effects of strength-training tapers of different intensities but equal volume reductions on neuromuscular performance. Methods: Eleven strength-trained men (21.3 [3.3] y, 92.3 [17.6] kg, relative 1-repetition-maximum deadlift 1.9 [0.2] times bodyweight) completed a crossover study. Specifically, two 4-wk strength-training blocks were followed by a taper week with reduced volume (∼70%) involving either increased (5.9%) or decreased (−8.5%) intensity. Testing occurred pretraining (T1), posttraining (T2), and posttaper (T3). Salivary testosterone and cortisol, plasma creatine kinase, a Daily Analysis of Life Demands in Athletes questionnaire, countermovement jump (CMJ), isometric midthigh pull, and isometric bench press were measured. Results: CMJ height improved significantly over time (P < .001), with significant increases from T1 (38.0 [5.5] cm) to both T2 (39.3 [5.3] cm; P = .010) and T3 (40.0 [5.3] cm; P = .001) and from T2 to T3 (P = .002). CMJ flight time:contraction time increased significantly over time (P = .004), with significant increases from T1 (0.747 [0.162]) to T2 (0.791 [0.163]; P = .012). Isometric midthigh-pull relative peak force improved significantly over time (P = .033), with significant increases from T1 (34.7 [5.0] N/kg) to T2 (35.9 [4.8] N/kg; P = .013). No significant changes were found between tapers. However, the higher-intensity taper produced small effect-size increases at T3 vs T1 for isometric midthigh-pull relative peak force, CMJ height, and flight time:contraction time, while the lower-intensity taper only produced small effect-size improvements at T3 vs T1 for CMJ height. Conclusions: A strength-training taper with volume reductions had a positive effect on power, with a tendency for the higher-intensity taper to produce more favorable changes in strength and power.

Pritchard and Stewart are with the Faculty of Health Sciences, and Pritchard also with Exercise and Wellness, Universal College of Learning, Palmerston North, New Zealand. Pritchard, Keogh, and McGuigan are with Sports Performance Research Inst New Zealand, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand. Barnes is with the School of Sport and Exercise, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand. Keogh is also with the Faculty of Health Sciences & Medicine, Bond University, Robina, QLD, Australia, and the Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, QLD, Australia. McGuigan is also with the School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA, Australia.

Pritchard (h.pritchard@ucol.ac.nz) is corresponding author.
International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
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