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Background: Carbohydrate (CHO) mouth rinse (MR) before exercise has been shown to improve physical performance and corticospinal motor excitability. Purpose: To determine the effects of different forms of CHO MR on quadriceps muscle performance and corticospinal motor excitability. Methods: 10 subjects (5 female and 5 male; 25 [1] y, 1.71 [0.03] m, 73 [5] kg) completed 4 conditions (placebo [PLA], 6.4% glucose [GLU], 6.4% maltose [MAL], 6.4% maltodextrin [MDX]). Maximal voluntary contraction (MVIC) of the right quadriceps and motor-evoked potential (MEP) of the right rectus femoris was determined pre (10 min), immediately after, and post (10 min) 20-s MR. MEP was precipitated by transcranial magnetic stimulation during muscle contraction (50% MVIC). Results: The relative change in MEP from pre-measures was different across treatments (P = .025) but was not different across time (P = .357). MEP was greater for all CHO conditions immediately after (GLU = 2.58% [5.33%], MAL = 3.92% [3.90%], MDX = 18.28% [5.57%]) and 10 min after (GLU = 14.09% [13.96%], MAL = 8.64% [8.67%], MDX = 31.54% [12.77%]) MR than PLA (immediately after = −2.19% [4.25%], 10 min = −13.41% [7.46%]). MVC was greater for CHO conditions immediately (GLU = 3.98% [2.49%], MAL = 5.89% [2.29%], MDX = 7.66% [1.93%]) and 10 min after (GLU = 7.22% [2.77%], MAL = 10.26% [4.22%], MDX = 10.18% [1.50%]) MR than PLA (immediately after = −3.24% [1.50%], 10 min = −6.46% [2.22%]). Conclusions: CHO MR increased corticospinal motor excitability and quadriceps muscle after application. The form of CHO used did not influence this response.

Bailey, Hibbard, La Forge, Mitchell, and Folger are with the Dept of Physical Therapy Education, Elon University, Elon, NC. Harris is with the Dept of Food, Bioprocessing, and Nutrition Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC. Roelands is with the Human Physiology Research Group, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.

Bailey (baileys@elon.edu) is corresponding author.
International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
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