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Purpose: The session rating of perceived exertion (sRPE) is a well-accepted method of monitoring training load in athletes in many different sports. It is based on the category-ratio (0–10) RPE scale (BORG-CR10) developed by Borg. There is no evidence how substitution of the Borg 6–20 RPE scale (BORG-RPE) might influence the sRPE in athletes. Methods: Systematically training, recreational-level athletes from a number of sport disciplines performed 6 randomly ordered, 30-min interval-training sessions, at intensities based on peak power output (PPO) and designed to be easy (50% PPO), moderate (75% PPO), or hard (85% PPO). Ratings of sRPE were obtained 30 min postexercise using either the BORG-CR10 or BORG-RPE and compared for matched exercise conditions. Results: The average percentage of heart-rate reserve was well correlated with sRPE from both BORG-CR10 (r = .76) and BORG-RPE (r = .69). The sRPE ratings from BORG-CR10 and BORG-RPE were very strongly correlated (r = .90) at matched times. Conclusions: Although producing different absolute numbers, sRPE derived from either the BORG-CR10 or BORG-RPE provides essentially interchangeable estimates of perceived exercise training intensity.

Arney, Glover, de Koning, Jaime, Mikat, Porcari, and Foster are with the Dept of Exercise and Sport Science, University of Wisconsin–La Crosse, La Crosse, WI. Fusco and Cortis are with the Dept of Human Sciences, Society and Health, University of Cassino and Lazio Meridionale, Cassino, Italy. Fusco is also with the Dept of Sport Science & Kinesiology, University of Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria. de Koning, van Erp, and Foster are with the Dept of Human Movement Sciences, Amsterdam Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Arney (arney.blaine@uwlax.edu) is corresponding author.
International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance

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