Interday Reliability and Usefulness of a Reactive Strength Index Derived From 2 Maximal Rebound Jump Tests

in International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
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Purpose: To examine the interday reliability and usefulness of a reactive strength index (RSI) derived from a maximal 5-rebound jump test (5max RJT) and a maximal 10-rebound jump test (10/5 RJT). Methods: Twenty male field-sport athletes (24.5 [3.0] y, 1.78 [0.1] m, 84.9 [5.2] kg) and 15 female participants (21.1 [0.9] y, 1.65 [0.73] m, 62.0 [5.1] kg) performed 2 maximal repetitions of the 5max RJT and the 10/5 RJT on 2 testing days after a specific warm-up. A 1-wk period separated testing days, and these sessions were preceded by a familiarization session. RSI was calculated by dividing jump height (in meters) by contact time (in seconds). The 5max RJT and the 10/5 RJT trial with the highest RSI on each testing day were used for reliability and usefulness analysis. Results: Both tests were deemed reliable for determining RSI for male, female, and pooled male and female cohorts, as the intraclass correlation coefficients were ≥.80 and the coefficient of variation was ≤10%. Only the 5max RJT was rated as “good” at detecting the smallest worthwhile change in performance for female athletes (smallest worthwhile change: 0.10 > typical error: 0.07). The 5max RJT for men and the 10/5 RJT for men and women were rated “good” in detecting a moderate change in performance only. Conclusions: Both tests are reliable for the determination of RSI, but the usefulness of the tests in detecting the smallest worthwhile change is questionable.

Comyns, Fleming, and Fitzgerald are with the Dept of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland. Comyns is also with the Health Research Inst at the university. Flanagan is with the Sport Ireland Inst, Dublin, Ireland. Harper is with the School of Sport, York St John University, York, United Kingdom.

Comyns (tom.comyns@ul.ie) is corresponding author.
International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
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