Comparison of a Countermovement Jump Test and Submaximal Run Test to Quantify the Sensitivity for Detecting Practically Important Changes Within High-Performance Australian Rules Football

in International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
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Purpose: To determine the typical variation of variables from a countermovement jump (CMJ) test and a submaximal run test (SRT), along with comparing the sensitivity of each test for the detection of practically important changes within high-performance Australian rules football players. Methods: A total of 23 professional and semiprofessional Australian rules football players performed 6 CMJs and three 8-second 50-m runs every 30 seconds (SRT), 7 days apart. Absolute and trial-to-trial reliability was represented as a coefficient of variation, CV (±90% confidence intervals). Test–retest reliability was examined using the magnitude of the difference (effect size [±90% confidence interval]) from week 1 to week 2. The smallest worthwhile change was calculated as 0.25 × SD. Results: Good reliability (CVs = 6.6%–9.3%) was determined for all variables except eccentric displacement (CV = 12.8%), with no clear changes observed in any variables between week 1 and week 2. All variables from the SRT possessed a CV less than smallest worthwhile change, indicating an ability to detect practically important changes in performance. Only peak velocity from the CMJ test possessed a CV less than smallest worthwhile change, exhibiting a limitation of this test in detecting practically meaningful changes within this environment. Conclusions: The results suggest that while all variables possess acceptable reliability, a SRT might offer to be a more sensitive monitoring tool than a CMJ test within high-performance Australian rules football, due to its greater ability for detecting practically important changes in performance.

J. Garrett, Graham, Eston, Burgess, and Norton are with the Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity, Sansom Inst for Health Research, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia. J. Garrett and Graham are also with Port Adelaide Football Club, Adelaide, SA, Australia. L.J. Garrett is with the School of Science, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Jakeman is with Sport and Health Science, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom. Burgess is also with Arsenal Football Club, St Albans, London, United Kingdom.

J. Garrett (joel.garrett@mymail.unisa.edu.au) is corresponding author.
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