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Objective: To (1) compare the 1-repetition-maximum (1RM) performance between the push press, push jerk, and split jerk and (2) explore these differences between weightlifters, CrossFit athletes, and a mixed group of athletes. Methods: Forty-six resistance-trained males (age 28.8 [6.4] y; height 180.0 [6.0] cm; body mass 84.1 [10.2] kg; weightlifting training experience 3.64 [3.14] y) participated in this study. The 1RM performance of the push press, push jerk, and split jerk was assessed during the same session in a sequential order (ie, combined 1RM assessment method). Thirty-six participants were retested to determine between-sessions reliability of the 1RM values. Results: Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) showed a high between-sessions reliability for the push press (ICC = .98; 95% CI, .95–.99), push jerk (ICC = .99; 95% CI, .98–1.00), and split jerk (ICC = .99; 95% CI, .98–1.00). There was a significant main effect of exercise (η2 = .101) and exercise × group interaction (η2 = .012) on 1RM performance (P < .001), whereas the main effect of group did not reach statistical significance (P = .175). Conclusions: This study provides evidence that the weightlifting overhead press derivatives affect 1RM performance. In addition, the interaction of exercise and sport group was caused by the higher differences in 1RM performance between exercises for weightlifters compared with CrossFit and a mixed group of athletes. Therefore, strength and conditioning professionals should be aware that the differences in 1RM performance between weightlifting overhead-press derivatives may be affected by sport group.

Soriano and de Baranda are with the Dept of Physical Education and Sports Sciences, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain. Soriano and Comfort are with the University of Salford, Manchester, United Kingdom. Soriano is also with Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Camilo José Cela University, Madrid, Spain. García-Ramos is with the Dept of Sports Sciences and Physical Conditioning, Faculty of Education, CIEDE, Catholic University of the Most Holy Conception, Concepción, Chile. Torres-González is with The House of Lifters National Weightlifting Club, Madrid, Spain. Castillo-Palencia is with Force Athletes: Education and Physical Athlete Development Center, Albacete, Spain. Marín is with CYMO Research Inst, Valladolid, Spain.

Soriano (msoriano@ucjc.edu; marcoantonio.sorianor@um.es) is corresponding author.
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