Self-Selecting the Number of Repetitions in Potentiation Protocols: Enhancement Effects on Jumping Performance

in International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
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Purpose: To investigate whether providing athletes with a choice regarding the number of repetitions to complete in a potentiation protocol would enhance jumping performance compared with protocols in which the number of repetitions is predetermined. Methods: Fifteen male basketball players completed 4 testing sessions separated by 72 hours. In the first session, individual optimum power loads in the barbell jump squat were determined. In the following 3 sessions, the athletes completed 3 sets of 3 potentiation protocols using optimum power load jump squats in a partly randomized order: (1) The traditional condition included 6 repetitions per set, (2) the self-selected condition included a choice regarding the number of repetitions to complete per set, and (3) the imposed condition included the same number of repetitions per set as the self-selected condition, but the number was imposed on the athletes beforehand. The jumping performance was determined as jump squat test height and measured using a force platform before and 30 seconds, 4 minutes, and 8 minutes after completing the protocols. Results: The self-selected condition led to superior jumping performance compared with the 2 other conditions across all post measures (P < .05; range: 0.3–1.3 cm). Compared with the traditional condition, the imposed condition led to superior jumping performance across all post measures (range: 0.2–0.45 cm), although not statistically significant at post 4 minutes and post 8 minutes. Conclusions: Choice provision concerning how many repetitions to complete in a potentiation protocol is a useful performance-enhancing strategy. Improved potentiation–fatigue ratio and motivational factors are sought to explain these effects.

Dello Iacono is with the School of Health and Life Sciences, University of the West of Scotland, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. Beato is with the School of Health and Sports Sciences, University of Suffolk, Ipswich, United Kingdom. Halperin is with the School of Public Health, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, and the Sylvan Adams Sports Inst, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

Dello Iacono (antonio.delloiacono@uws.ac.uk) is corresponding author.
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